Essay On Neon Gas

Characteristics of the Element Neon

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Characteristics of the Element Neon

Neon was discovered in 1898 by British chemists Sir William Ramsay and Morris W. Travers as a component of the most volatile fraction of liquefied crude argon obtained from air. Upon applying an electric current to it, the chemists found that it had an orange glow, and they decided that it was not argon, but rather a new element altogether.
Neon is not a very common element, but the places it is most abundant in are the earth's atmosphere, and trapped within rocks in the earth's crust. The place where it is most abundant, however, is the throughout the cosmos. In the earth's atmosphere, neon only comprises 0.0018 percent of the volume. On the earth, neon is always present as a gas.
There are many physical properties of neon, such as the fact that it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless. Also, neon is lighter than air. With a density of density 0.89990 g/liter. The freezing point of neon is -248.67° C, and the boiling point of neon is -246.048° C, which is even lower than the boiling point of nitrogen (-195.8°C). When under low pressure, neon emits a bright orange-red glow if a small electric current is passed through it. The electron configuration of neon is 1s22s22p6. The chemical properties of neon include the fact that it is not reactive because it has a full outer shell, and therefore cannot gain or lose any electrons. Because of this, neon belongs to a group of elements called "noble gases." These are all gases which have a full outer shell and cannot react in nature. The period of neon is 2, and the group is 18.
Neon has an atomic number of 10, and a mass of 20.180. Neon has three stable isotopes: neon 20, 21, and 22. These three isotopes comprise 90.92 percent of natural neon, 0.26 percent of natural neon, and 8.82 percent of natural neon, respectively. There are five other isotopes of neon, and they are all radioactive. None of these five isotopes occur in nature.
There is only one common use for neon, and that is in electric and fluorescent lights to produce a bright orange-red glow.

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Related Searches

Neon         Element         Characteristics         Boiling Point         Electric Current         Freezing Point         Physical Properties         Configuration         Cosmos        





Neon is produced industrially by distillation of liquefied air. The most volatile part of the liquid air is comprised of nitrogen, neon, and helium. The nitrogen is removed by condensation under increased pressure, and lowered temperature. Then, the nitrogen is adsorbed by highly cooled charcoal. Neon is separated from helium by selective adsorption on activated charcoal at low temperatures. Extracting neon from air is lengthy, and produces only 1 pound of neon for every 88,000 pounds of air that is processed.



Air is a mixture of gases. Three elements make up over 99.9 percent of the composition of dry air: these are nitrogen, oxygen, and argon.

Composition of Dry Air – The Data

The numbers below are averages. In modern times, the percentage of carbon dioxide in air has been rising with the burning of fossil fuels. Methane has also risen significantly.
Nitrogen78.08%
Oxygen20.95%
Argon 0.93%
Carbon Dioxide0.04%
Neon0.018%
Helium0.00052%
Methane0.00018%
Krypton0.00011%
Hydrogen0.000055%
Nitrous Oxide0.000032%
Carbon Monoxide0.00002%
Xenon0.0000087%

Solid argon

How Air’s Composition was Discovered

In 1640, the Flemish chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont burned charcoal to produce the previously unidentified gas carbon dioxide.

In 1674, the English physician John Mayow established that air is not a single element, it is made up of different substances. He did this by showing that only a part of air is combustible. Most of it is not.

Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Carbon Dioxide

In the 1750s, the Scottish chemist Joseph Black discovered that carbon dioxide is present in air.

In 1772, the Scottish chemist Daniel Rutherford, who was actually Joseph Black’s student, reported his discovery of “noxious air,” which we now call nitrogen.

In 1774, oxygen was discovered by the English chemist Joseph Priestley, although two years earlier in Sweden Carl Scheele had discovered oxygen, but had not published his results.

In 1785, Sir Henry Cavendish was dissatisfied with scientific knowledge about the air around us, which was believed to be entirely composed of oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide.

He knew nitrogen in air could be reacted with oxygen to form, ultimately, nitrous acid. He aimed to find out if ALL of the air that was not oxygen or carbon dioxide could be converted to nitrous acid. If it could, he would have proved that air was entirely oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

Cavendish sparked air in a jar with electricity to react oxygen and nitrogen to form nitrogen oxides. He then added additional oxygen and sparked the air again until all the nitrogen had reacted.

Nitrogen oxides are acidic. Cavendish used aqueous sodium hydroxide to remove them from the apparatus. [This would also, of course, have removed any carbon dioxide that was present.] He removed the remaining oxygen using potassium polysulfides.

A small bubble of gas remained. We know now this was mostly argon. Cavendish wrote that this bubble “was not more than one hundred and twentieth of the bulk of the phlostigated air [nitrogen].” (1)

At Least One More Gas is Present in Air

So, Cavendish had learned that air is at least 99.3 percent nitrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide with a maximum 0.7 percent of something else. We now know that the ‘something else,’ argon, is very unreactive; this enabled Cavendish to find it, but it also prevented him finding out more about it. (The giant advances in spectroscopy made by Gustav Kirchhoff and Robert Bunsen lay 85 years in the future.)

In hindsight, we can say Cavendish slightly underestimated the part of air that isn’t oxygen, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide. Despite this, he was ahead of his time. After his experiment, more than 100 years passed until scientists again began to think that something about air didn’t quite add up.

In 1892 John William Strutt (better known as Lord Rayleigh) announced that no matter how it was prepared, oxygen was always 15.882 times denser than hydrogen. This very precise work had taken ten years to complete.

Continuing to work with great attention to detail, he found that the nitrogen in air was always denser by about 0.5 percent than nitrogen sourced from nitrogen compounds. (2), (3) How could this be explained?

In 1893, Rayleigh wrote to Nature, announcing the problem to the world. (Any scientist who responded to that challenge actually had the chance of discovering a new element. None did!)

In April 1894, Rayleigh wrote an academic paper about the nitrogen problem. Funnily enough, he viewed pure nitrogen, containing no argon, as ‘abnormally light nitrogen.’ He stored it for eight months and retested it to see whether its density would increase. (4)

Rayleigh’s paper awakened the serious interest of William Ramsay, who had already been aware of the problem.

Rayleigh and Ramsay carried out further experiments, keeping in touch with one another about their progress.

Argon and the Noble Gases

In August 1894, Ramsay took air and removed its components – oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. He removed the nitrogen by reacting it with magnesium.

After removing all the known gases from air, he found the gas remaining occupied one-eightieth of the original volume. Its spectrum matched no known gas.

Rayleigh and Ramsay wrote a joint paper in 1895 notifying the world of their discovery. The new gas wouldn’t react with anything, so they named it argon, from the Greek ‘argos’, meaning inactive or lazy. (5)

In his Nobel Prize winning address, Rayleigh said: “Argon must not be deemed rare. A large hall may easily contain a greater weight of it than a man can carry.” (6)

William Ramsay discovered or codiscovered most of the other noble gases: helium, neon, krypton and xenon.

He was responsible for adding an entire new group to the periodic table. Radon was the only noble gas he didn’t discover.

References

  1. Encyclopaedia Perthensis, or, Universal dictionary of the arts, Sciences, Literature, &c., 1816, vol 1, p231-232, John Brown.
  2. John H. Wolfenden, The Noble Gases and the Periodic Table: Telling it like it was., J. Chem. Educ., 1969, 46 (9), p569.
  3. Mary Elvira Weeks, The Discovery of the Elements. XVIII. The Inert Gases., J. Chem. Educ., 1932, 9 (12), p2065.
  4. Lord Rayleigh, On an Anomaly Encountered in Determinations of the Density of Nitrogen Gas., Proc. Roy. Soc. London, 1894, 55, p340.
  5. Vivi Ringnes, Origin of the Names of Chemical Elements, J. Chem. Educ., 1989, 66 (9), p731.
  6. Lord Rayleigh, The Density of Gases in the Air and the Discovery of Argon, Nobel Lecture, December 12, 1904. (pdf download.)
  7. Robert L. Kelly, David Hurst Thomas, Archaeology., Sixth Edition, 2012, Wadsworth, p137.
  8. Image by Deglr6328.

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