Dissertation Format Ukuran

JUDUL ARTIKEL ILMIAH (Berbahasa Indonesia dan Inggris)

(ARIAL 14, BOLD, CENTRE, HURUF KAPITAL, SPASI 1)

 

Penulis1, Penulis2

Lembaga Penulis1, Lembaga Penulis2

email korespondensi: misalny@unj.ac.id

Abstract: Title in Indonesian or English, formulated with clear and concise, no more than 40 characters, written in Arial font, size 14, bold, 1 spacing, center margin, uppercase and less than 12 words. Topics raised or a research dissertation. Name the author of all without a title, written with Arial font, size 12 pts, bold, center margin. The name of the second row in the order agency authors, written with Arial font, size 10, center margin. Author email address in the third row. If there is a second and subsequent writers, writing together with the identity of the first author. Abstract manuscript written in English and Indonesia, Arial font, size 10, 1 space. Maximum length of abstract is 250 words. Type the entire abstract as single paragraph. The contents are objective research, method, population, sample, instrumen and result.For abstract in English is written in italic. Keywords written in Arial font, size 10 pts, below the abstract text.

Keywords: keywords 1, keywords 2, etc(no more than five keywords)

Abstrak: Judul dalam bahasa Indonesia atau Inggris, dirumuskan dengan singkat dan jelas, tidak lebih dari 40 karakter, ditulis dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 14, bold, 1 spasi, margin tengah, huruf kapital dan kurang dari 12 kata. Topik diangkat atau merupakan hasil penelitian disertasi. Nama penulis semua tanpa gelar, ditulis dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 12 pts, bold, margin tengah. Nama lembaga pada baris kedua sesuai urutan lembaga penulis, ditulis dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 10, margin tengah.  Alamat email penulis pada baris ketiga. Jika ada penulis kedua dan seterusnya, penulisan identitas sama dengan penulis pertama. Untuk bahasa Inggris tulisan dicetak miring. Naskah Abstrak ditulis dalam bahasa Inggris dan Indonesia dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 10, 1 spasi. Panjang abstrak maksimum terdiri dari 250 kata. Abstrak berisi tujuan penelitian, metode, populasi, sampel, instrumen, dan hasil. Untuk abstrak dalam bahasa inggris ditulis italic. Kata kunci ditulis dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 10 pts, dibawah naskah abstrak. Tulisan kata kunci ditulis bold.

Kata kunci: kata kunci 1, kata kunci 2, dst


Artikel Ilmiah ditulis dengan format 1 kolom. Pendahuluan tidak perlu diberi judul, ditulis langsung setelah kata kunci, dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 12, spasi 2 di kertas A4, dengan margin kiri 4cm, kanan 3cm, atas 4cm, dan bawah 3cm dengan jumlah halaman ±20 halaman. Pendahuluan berisi latar belakang permasalahan yang didukung oleh konsep, teori dan hasil-hasil penelitian dari sumber-sumber pustaka yang relevan dan mutakhir. Diakhir pendahuluan disebutkan tujuan penulisan artikel atau penelitian secara jelas.

METODE (Level II)

Metode berisi jenis metode atau jenis pendekatan yang digunakan, uraian data kualitatif dan/atau kuantitatif, prosedur pengumpulan data, dan prosedur analisis data.

HASIL (Level II)

Hasil berisi jawaban dari permasalahan penelitian secara kuantitatif dan/atau kualitatif secara jelas, tepat dan lengkap yang dapat menggunakan informasi dalam bentuk gambar/grafik/tabel/uraian secara aktual.

PEMBAHASAN (Level II)

Pembahasan berisi ringkasan hasil penelitiannya, keterkaitan dengan konsep atau teori dan hasil penelitian lain yang relevan, interpretasi temuan, keterbatasan penelitian, serta  implikasinya terhadap perkembangan konsep atau keilmuan.

KESIMPULAN (Level II)

Kesimpulan berisi rangkuman jawaban atas permasalahan penelitian yang merupakan sumbangan terhadap perkembangan keilmuan.

Penulisan Tabel dan Gambar (Level III)

Tabel (Level IV)

Untuk format penulisan Tabel, judul Tabel berada di atas Tabel dan diberi nomor sesuai urutan tabel, seperti contoh di bawah ini:

Tabel 1. Jumlah Sampel Madrasah Berda­sarkan Lokasi Penelitian dan Kategori Akreditasi

Judul Tabel dan nomor tabel ditulis dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 10 pts, margin tengah, untuk tulisan Tabel dan nomor tabel ditulis cetak tebal. Tulisan dalam tabel ditulis dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 10 pts, spasi 1. Baris pertama pada tabel (judul kolom) dicetak tebal.

Gambar (Level IV)

Untuk format pencantuman Gambar, judul gambar berada di bawah gambar dan diberi nomor sesuai urutan gambar, seperti contoh di bawah ini:

Gambar 2. Indonesian Journal of Educational Review

Judul Gambar dan nomor gambar ditulis dengan huruf Arial, ukuran 10 pts, margin tengah, untuk tulisan Gambar dan nomor tabel ditulis cetak tebal.

Penulisan Judul dan Subjudul (Level III)

Untuk penulisan Judul dan sub judul diatur dengan level/tingkatan sebagai berikut:

  • Level I : semua capital, bold, margin tengah, Arial ukuran 14 (contoh penulisan JUDUL ARTIKEL)
  • Level II : semua capital, bold, rapat kiri, Arial ukuran 12 (Contoh penulisan subjudul METODE, HASIL, PEMBAHASAN, KESIMPULAN, DAFTAR PUSTAKA)
  • Level III : hanya huruf awal kata yang capital, bold, rapat kiri, Arial ukuran 12 (contoh penulisan subjudul Penulisan Tabel dan Gambar)
  • Level IV : hanya huruf awal yang capital, italic, rapat kiri, Arial ukuran 12 (contoh penulisan subjudul Tabel)

DAFTAR PUSTAKA (Level II)

Daftar pustaka berisi rujukan yang digunakan hanya dalam penulisan artikel ini. Format penulisan mengikuti format APA sebagai berikut:

  • Engelmore, R., Morgan, A. eds. (1986). Blackboard Systems. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley. ← BUKU
  • Robinson, A.L. (1980). New Ways to Make Microcircuits Smaller. Science, 208: 1019-1026. ← JURNAL ILMIAH
  • Bhavsar, D.S., Saraf, K.B. (2002). Morphology of PbI2 Crystals Grown by Gel Method. Crystal Research and Technology, 37: 51–55 ← JURNAL ILMIAH
  • Hasling, D.W., Clancey, W.J., Rennels, G.R. (1983). Strategic Explanations in Consultation. The International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 20(1): 3-19. ← JURNAL ILMIAH
  • Clancey, W.J. (1983). Communication, Simulation, and In-telligent Agents: Implications of Personal Intelligent Machines for Medical Education. In Proceedings of the Eighth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, 556-560. Menlo Park, Calif.: International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence, Inc. ← KONFERENSI/PROSIDING
  • Rice, J. (1986). Poligon: A System for Parallel Problem Solving, Technical Report, KSL-86-19, Dept. of Computer Science, Stanford Univ. ← REPORT
  • Clancey, W.J. (1979). Transfer of Rule-Based Expertise through a Tutorial Dialogue. PhD Dissertation, Department of Computer Science, Stanford University. ←TESIS/DISERTASI
  • Ivey, K.C. (2 September 1996). Citing Internet sources URL http://www.eei- alex.com/eye/utw/96aug.html. ←WEBSITE

Daftar Unduhan mengenai Penulisan Artikel Ilmiah bagi Mahasiswa PPs UNJ

  1. Template Penulisan Artikel Ilmiah Mahasiswa Program S2 dan S3
  2. Lembar Pengesahan Artikel Ilmiah – Pembimbing/Promotor
  3. Lembar Pengesahan Artikel Ilmiah – Reviewer
  4. Standar Penulisan Daftar Pustaka/Referensi berdasarkan APA Style : 1. APA System Harvard; 2. APA System

For sizing as the ingredient used in papermaking, see Sizing § Papermaking.

Many paper size standards conventions have existed at different times and in different countries. Today, the A and B series of ISO 216, which includes the commonly used A4 size, are the international standard used by almost every country. However, in many countries in the Americas as well as in the Philippines, the North American series of paper sizes such as 'Letter' is more prevalent.[1]

Paper sizes affect writing paper, stationery, cards, and some printed documents. The international standard for envelopes is the C series of ISO 269.

International paper sizes[edit]

Main article: ISO 216

See Switching costs, Network effects and Standardization for possible reasons for differing regional adoption rates of the ISO standard sizes.

The international paper size standard is ISO 216. It is based on the German DIN 476 standard for paper sizes. ISO paper sizes are all based on a single aspect ratio of the square root of 2, or approximately 1:1.4142. There are different series, as well as several extensions.

The following international paper sizes are included in Cascading Style Sheets (CSS): A3, A4, A5, B4, B5.[2]

A series[edit]

The base A0 size of paper is defined as having an area of 1 m2 and a side ratio of 1 by √2, making the A0 paper size exactly  m ×  m. Rounded to the nearest millimetre, that is 841 by 1,189 millimetres (33.1 in × 46.8 in).

Successive paper sizes in the series A1, A2, A3, and so forth, are defined by halving the preceding paper size across the larger dimension. This also effectively halves the area of each sheet. The most frequently used paper size is A4 measuring 210 by 297 millimetres (8.27 in × 11.7 in).

The significant advantage of this system is its scaling: if a sheet with an aspect ratio of √2 is divided into two equal halves parallel to its shortest sides, then the halves will again have an aspect ratio of √2. Folded brochures of any size can be made by using sheets of the next larger size, e.g. A4 sheets are folded to make A5 brochures. The system allows scaling without compromising the aspect ratio from one size to another—as provided by office photocopiers, e.g. enlarging A4 to A3 or reducing A3 to A4. Similarly, two sheets of A4 can be scaled down and fit exactly on 1 sheet without any cutoff or margins.

The behavior of the aspect ratio is easily proven: on a sheet of paper, let a be the long side and b be the short side; thus, a/b = √2. When the sheet of paper is folded in half widthwise, let c be the length of the new short side: c = a/2. If we take the ratio of the newly folded paper we have:

Therefore, the aspect ratio is preserved for the new dimensions of the folded paper.

Weights are easy to calculate as well: a standard A4 sheet made from 80 g/m2 paper weighs 5 g (as it is ​116 of an A0 page, measuring 1 m2), allowing one to easily compute the weight—and associated postage rate—by counting the number of sheets used.

The advantages of basing a paper size upon an aspect ratio of √2 were first noted in 1786 by the German scientist and philosopher Georg Christoph Lichtenberg.[3] The formats that became A2, A3, B3, B4 and B5 were developed in France on proposition of the mathematician Lazare Carnot and published for judiciary purpose in 1798 during the French Revolution.[4] Early in the 20th century, Dr Walter Porstmann turned Lichtenberg's idea into a proper system of different paper sizes. Porstmann's system was introduced as a DIN standard (DIN 476) in Germany in 1922, replacing a vast variety of other paper formats. Even today, the paper sizes are called "DIN A4" (IPA:[diːn.ʔaː.fiːɐ̯]) in everyday use in Germany and Austria.

The DIN 476 standard spread quickly to other countries. Before the outbreak of World War II, it had been adopted by the following countries:

During World War II, the standard was adopted by Uruguay (1942), Argentina (1943) and Brazil (1943), and afterwards spread to other countries:

By 1975, so many countries were using the German system that it was established as an ISO standard, as well as the official United Nations document format. By 1977, A4 was the standard letter format in 88 of 148 countries. Today the standard has been adopted by all countries in the world except the United States and Canada. In Mexico, Costa Rica, Colombia, Venezuela, Chile, and the Philippines, the US letter format is still in common use, despite their official adoption of the ISO standard.

B series[edit]

In addition to the A series, there is a less common B series. The area of B series sheets is the geometric mean of successive A series sheets. So, B1 is between A0 and A1 in size, with an area of 0.707 m2 (​1√2 m2). As a result, B0 is 1 metre wide, and other sizes in the B series are a half, a quarter or further fractions of a metre wide. While less common in office use, it is used for a variety of special situations. Many posters use B-series paper or a close approximation, such as 50 cm × 70 cm; B5 is a relatively common choice for books. The B series is also used for envelopes and passports. The B-series is widely used in the printing industry to describe both paper sizes and printing press sizes, including digital presses. B3 paper is used to print two US letter or A4 pages side by side using imposition; four pages would be printed on B2, eight on B1, etc.

C series[edit]

The C series is usually used for envelopes and is defined in ISO 269. The area of C series sheets is the geometric mean of the areas of the A and B series sheets of the same number; for instance, the area of a C4 sheet is the geometric mean of the areas of an A4 sheet and a B4 sheet. This means that C4 is slightly larger than A4, and slightly smaller than B4. The practical usage of this is that a letter written on A4 paper fits inside a C4 envelope, and C4 paper fits inside a B4 envelope.

Some envelope formats with mixed sides from adjacent sizes (and thus an approximate aspect ratio of 2:1) are also defined in national adaptations of the ISO standard, e.g. DIN C6/C5 is 114 mm × 229 mm where the common side to C5 and C6 is 162 mm.

Overview: ISO paper sizes[edit]

FormatA series[5]B series[6]C series[7]
Sizemm × mmin × inmm × mmin × inmm × mmin × in
0841 × 118933.1 × 46.81000 × 141439.4 × 55.7917 × 129736.1 × 51.1
1594 × 84123.4 × 33.1707 × 100027.8 × 39.4648 × 91725.5 × 36.1
2420 × 59416.5 × 23.4500 × 70719.7 × 27.8458 × 64818.0 × 25.5
3297 × 42011.7 × 16.5353 × 50013.9 × 19.7324 × 45812.8 × 18.0
4210 × 2978.27 × 11.7250 × 3539.84 × 13.9229 × 3249.02 × 12.8
5148 × 2105.83 × 8.27176 × 2506.93 × 9.84162 × 2296.38 × 9.02
6105 × 1484.13 × 5.83125 × 1764.92 × 6.93114 × 1624.49 × 6.38
774 × 1052.91 × 4.1388 × 1253.46 × 4.9281 × 1143.19 × 4.49
852 × 742.05 × 2.9162 × 882.44 × 3.4657 × 812.24 × 3.19
937 × 521.46 × 2.0544 × 621.73 × 2.4440 × 571.57 × 2.24
1026 × 371.02 × 1.4631 × 441.22 × 1.7328 × 401.10 × 1.57

The tolerances specified in the standard are

  • ±1.5 mm (0.06 in) for dimensions up to 150 mm (5.9 in),
  • ±2 mm (0.08 in) for lengths in the range 150 to 600 mm (5.9 to 23.6 in) and
  • ±3 mm (0.12 in) for any dimension above 600 mm (23.6 in).

German extensions[edit]

The German standard DIN 476 was published on 18 August 1922 and is the original specification of the A, B and C sizes. In 1991, it was split into DIN 476-1 for the A and B formats on the one hand and 476-2 for the C series on the other hand. The former has been withdrawn in 2002 in favor of adopting the international standard as DIN EN ISO 216, but part 2 has been retained and was last updated in 2008.

The first and the second editions of DIN 476 from 1922 and 1925 also included a D series.

FormatD series
Sizemm × mmin × in
0771 × 109030.4 × 42.9
1545 × 77121.5 × 30.4
2385 × 54515.2 × 21.5
3272 × 38510.7 × 15.2
4192 × 2727.56 × 10.7
5136 × 1925.35 × 7.56
6096 × 1363.78 × 5.35
7068 × 0962.68 × 3.78
8048 × 0681.89 × 2.68

The smallest formats specified originally were A13, B13, C8 and D8.

FormatAB
Sizemm × mmin × inmm × mmin × in
1118 × 260.71 × 1.0222 × 310.87 × 1.22
1213 × 180.51 × 0.7115 × 220.59 × 0.87
1309 × 130.35 × 0.5111 × 150.43 × 0.59

DIN 476 provides for formats larger than A0, denoted by a prefix factor. In particular, it lists the formats 2A0 and 4A0, which are twice and four times the size of A0 respectively. However, ISO 216:2007 notes 2A0 and 4A0 in the table of Main series of trimmed sizes (ISO A series) as well: "The rarely used sizes [2A0 and 4A0] which follow also belong to this series."

Namemm × mmin × in
4A01682 × 237866.22 × 93.62
2A01189 × 168246.81 × 66.22

DIN 476 also used to specify slightly tighter tolerances than ISO 216:

  • ±1 mm (0.04 in) for dimensions up to 150 mm (5.9 in),
  • ±1.5 mm (0.06 in) for lengths in the range 150 mm to 600 mm (5.9 to 23.6 in) and
  • ±2 mm (0.08 in) for any dimension above 600 mm (23.6 in).

Swedish extensions[edit]

The Swedish standard SIS 014711[8] generalized the ISO system of A, B, and C formats by adding D, E, F, and G formats to it. Its D format sits between a B format and the next larger A format (just like C sits between A and the next larger B). The remaining formats fit in between all these formats, such that the sequence of formats A4, E4, C4, G4, B4, F4, D4, H4, A3 is a geometric progression, in which the dimensions grow by a factor 16√2 from one size to the next. However, this SIS standard does not define any size between a D format and the next larger A format (called H in the previous example).

Of these additional formats, G5 (169 × 239 mm) and E5 (155 × 220 mm) are popular in Sweden and the Netherlands for printing dissertations,[9] but the other formats have not turned out to be particularly useful in practice and they have not been adopted internationally.

The Swedish and German D series basically contain the same sizes, but are offset by one, i.e. DIN D4 equals SIS D5 and so on.

DesignationLonger edgeShorter edge
(Hn)r+5½ × snr+1½ × sn
Dnr+5 × snr+1 × sn
Fnr+4½ × snr × sn
Bnr+4 × snr0 × sn
Gnr+3½ × snr−½ × sn
Cnr+3 × snr−1 × sn
Enr+2½ × snr−1½ × sn
Anr+2 × snr−2 × sn

Japanese B-series variant[edit]

The JIS defines two main series of paper sizes. The JIS A-series is identical to the ISO A-series, but with slightly different tolerances. The area of B-series paper is 1.5 times that of the corresponding A-paper (instead of the factor √2 = 1.414... for the ISO B-series), so the length ratio is approximately 1.22 times the length of the corresponding A-series paper. The aspect ratio of the paper is the same as for A-series paper. Both A- and B-series paper is widely available in Japan, Taiwan and China, and most photocopiers are loaded with at least A4 and either one of A3, B4 and B5 paper.

There are also a number of traditional paper sizes, which are now used mostly by printers. The most common of these old series are the Shiroku-ban and the Kiku paper sizes.

FormatB seriesShiroku banKiku
Sizemm × mmin × inmm × mmin × inmm × mmin × in
01030 × 145640.55 × 57.32
1728 × 103028.66 × 40.55
2515 × 72820.28 × 28.66
3364 × 51514.33 × 20.28
4257 × 36410.12 × 14.33264 × 37910.39 × 14.92227 × 3068.94 × 12.05
5182 × 2577.17 × 10.12189 × 2627.44 × 10.31151 × 2275.94 × 8.94
6128 × 1825.04 × 7.17127 × 1885.00 × 7.40
791 × 1283.58 × 5.04
864 × 912.52 × 3.58
945 × 641.77 × 2.52
1032 × 451.26 × 1.77
1122 × 320.87 × 1.26
1216 × 220.63 × 0.87

Following Japanese paper sizes are included in Cascading Style Sheets (CSS): JIS-B4, JIS-B5.[2]

Chinese extensions[edit]

The Chinese standard GB/T 148-1997[11] documents the standard ISO series, A and B, but adds a custom D series. This Chinese format originates from the Republic of China (1912–49). The D series is not identical to the Swedish D series. It does not strictly follow the same principles as ISO paper sizes: The aspect ratio is only very roughly √2. The short side of a size is always 4 mm longer than the long side of the next smaller size. The long side of a size is always exactly – i.e. without further rounding – twice as long as the short side of the next smaller size.

FormatD seriesAspect ratioRD series[citation needed]
Sizemm × mmin × inmm × mmin × in
0764 × 106429.9 × 41.91.3927787 × 109231.0 × 43.0
1532 × 76020.9 × 29.91.4286546 × 78721.5 × 31.0
2380 × 52815.0 × 20.81.3895393 × 54615.5 × 21.5
3264 × 37610.4 × 14.81.4242273 × 39310.7 × 15.5
4188 × 2607.4 × 10.21.3830196 × 2737.7 × 10.7
5130 × 1845.1 × 7.21.4154136 × 1965.4 × 7.7
692 × 1263.6 × 5.01.369698 × 1363.9 × 5.4

Soviet variants[edit]

The general adaptation of ISO 216 in the Soviet Union was GOST 9327-60. In its 1960 version, it lists formats down to A13, B12 and C8 and also specifies ½, ¼ and ⅛ prefixes for halving the shorter side (repeatedly), e.g. ½A4 = 105 mm × 297 mm.

A standard for technical drawings from 1960, GOST 3450-60[12], introduces alternative numeric format designations to deal with very high or very wide sheets. These 2-digit codes are based upon A4 = "11": The first digit is the factor the longer side (297 mm) is multiplied by and the second digit is the one for the shorter side (210 mm), so "24" is 2×297 mm × 4×210 mm = 594 mm × 840 mm.

n(×1)×2×3×4×5×6
A0841×11891682×11892523×11893364×11894204×11895045×1189
A1594×841= A01784×8412378×8412973×8413568×841
A2420×594= A11261×5951682×5952102×5952523×595
A3297×420= A2892×4201189×4201487×4201784×420
A4210×297= A3631×297841×2971051×2971261×297
A5148×210= A4446×210595×210743×210892×210

GOST 3450-60 was replaced 8 years later by ESKD GOST 2301-68[13], but the numeric designations remained in popular use much longer. The new designations were not purely numeric, but consisted of the ISO label followed by an 'x', or possibly the multiplication sign '×', and the factor, e.g. DIN 2A0 = GOST A0×2, but DIN 4A0 ≠ GOST A0×4, also listed are: A0×3, A1×3, A1×4, A2×3–A2×5, A3×3–A3×7, A4×3–A4×9. The formats …×1 and …×2 usually would be aliases for existing formats.

North American paper sizes[edit]

Loose sizes[edit]

Sizein × inmm × mmAspect ratio
Letter​8 12 × 11216 × 2791.2941…
Legal​8 12 × 14216 × 3561.6470…
Tabloid11 × 17279 × 4321.54
Ledger[14]17 × 11432 × 2790.6470…
Junior Legal5 × 8127 × 2031.6
Half Letter, Memo​5 12 × ​8 12140 × 2161.54
Government Letter8 × ​10 12203 × 2671.3125
Government Legal​8 12 × 13216 × 3301.5294…

The United States, several other American countries and the Philippines[1] primarily use a different system of paper sizes compared to the rest of the world. The current standard sizes are unique to that continent, although due to the size of the North American market and proliferation of both software and printing hardware from the region, other parts of the world have become increasingly familiar with these sizes (though not necessarily the paper itself). Some traditional North American inch-based sizes differ from the Imperial British sizes described below.

Common loose sizes[edit]

Letter, Legal and Ledger/Tabloid are by far the most commonly used of these for everyday activities, and the only ones included in Cascading Style Sheets (CSS).

The origins of the exact dimensions of Letter size paper (8 12 in × 11 in or 216 mm × 279 mm) are lost in tradition and not well documented. The American Forest and Paper Association argues that the dimension originates from the days of manual paper making, and that the 11-inch length of the page is about a quarter of "the average maximum stretch of an experienced vatman's arms."[15] However, this does not explain the width or aspect ratio.

Outside of North America, Letter size may also be known as "American Quarto".[16] If one accepts some trimming, the size is indeed one quarter of the old Imperial paper size known as Demy, 17 12 in × 22 12 in (444 mm × 572 mm).[17]

Usage and adoption[edit]

SizeEquivalentmm × mmin × inRatio
CartaLetter, ANSI A216 × 2798½ × 111.2916
OficioGovernment Legal216 × 3308½ × 131.527
Extra TabloideArch B305 × 45712 × 181.5

US paper sizes are currently standard in the United States and at least in the Philippines, Colombia and Chile. The latter use US Letter, but their Legal size is 8 12 in × 13 in (216 mm × 330 mm).[18]

Mexico and Colombia have adopted the ISO standard, but US Letter format is still the system in use throughout the country. It is virtually impossible to encounter ISO standard papers in day-to-day uses, with "Carta 216 mm × 279 mm" (Letter), "Oficio 216 mm × 340 mm" (Government-Legal) and "Doble carta" (Ledger/Tabloid) being nearly universal. US sizes are also widespread and in common use in Colombia and some other countries in the Americas.[19]

In Canada, US paper sizes are a de facto standard. The government, however, also uses ISO paper sizes.

Variant loose sizes[edit]

There is an additional paper size, 8 in × 10 12 in (203 mm × 267 mm), to which the name Government-Letter was given by the IEEEPrinter Working Group (PWG). It was prescribed by Herbert Hoover when he was Secretary of Commerce to be used for US government forms, apparently to enable discounts from the purchase of paper for schools, but more likely due to the standard use of trimming books (after binding) and paper from the standard letter size paper to produce consistency and allow "bleed" printing. In later years, as photocopy machines proliferated, citizens wanted to make photocopies of the forms, but the machines did not generally have this size paper in their bins. Ronald Reagan therefore had the US government switch to regular Letter size, which is both half an inch longer and wider.[15] The former government size is still commonly used in spiral-bound notebooks, for children's writing and the like, a result of trimming from the current Letter dimensions.

By extension of the American standards, the halved Letter size, 5 12 in × 8 in (140 mm × 203 mm), meets the needs of many applications. It is variably known as Statement, Stationery, Memo, Half Letter, Half A (from ANSI sizes) or simply Half Size. Like the similar-sized ISO A5, it is used for everything from personal letter writing to official aeronautical maps. Organizers, notepads, and diaries also often use this size of paper; thus 3-ring binders are also available in this size. Booklets of this size are created using word processing tools with landscape printing in two columns on letter paper which are then cut or folded into the final size.

Standardized American paper sizes[edit]

In 1996, the American National Standards Institute adopted ANSI/ASME Y14.1 which defined a regular series of paper sizes based upon the de facto standard 8 12 in × 11 in (216 mm × 279 mm) Letter size which it assigned "ANSI A", intended for technical drawings, hence sometimes labeled "Engineering". This series is somewhat similar to the ISO standard in that cutting a sheet in half would produce two sheets of the next smaller size and therefore also includes Ledger/Tabloid as "ANSI B". Unlike the ISO standard, however, the arbitrary base sides forces this series to have two alternating aspect ratios. For example, ANSI A is less elongated than A4, while ANSI B is more elongated than A3.

The Canadian standard CAN2-9.60-M76 and its successor CAN/CGSB-9.60-94 "Paper Sizes for Correspondence" specified paper sizes P1 through P6, which are the ANSI paper sizes rounded to the nearest 5 mm.[20] All custom Canadian paper size standards were withdrawn in 2012 and the respective ISO standards took their places.

With care, documents can be prepared so that the text and images fit on either ANSI or their equivalent ISO sheets at 1:1 reproduction scale.

US sizein × inmm × mmRatioCanadian size (mm × mm)Similar size (mm × mm)
N/ACAN P6107 × 140ISO A6105 × 148
N/ACAN P5140 × 215ISO A5148 × 210
ANSI A​8 12 × 11216 × 2791.2941CAN P4215 × 280ISO A4210 × 297
ANSI B11 × 17279 × 4321.5455CAN P3280 × 430ISO A3297 × 420
ANSI C17 × 22432 × 5591.2941CAN P2430 × 560ISO A2420 × 594
ANSI D22 × 34559 × 8641.5455CAN P1560 × 860ISO A1594 × 841
ANSI E34 × 44864 × 11181.2941N/AISO A0841 × 1187

Other, informal, larger sizes continuing the alphabetic series illustrated above exist, but they are not part of the series per se, because they do not exhibit the same aspect ratios. For example, Engineering F size is 28 in × 40 in or 711 mm × 1,016 mm with ca. 1.4286:1; it is commonly required for NAVFAC drawings, but is generally less commonly used. Engineering G size is 22 12 in (572 mm) high, but it is a roll format with a variable width up to 90 in (2,286 mm) in increments of 8 12 in (216 mm). Engineering H through N sizes are also roll formats.

Such huge sheets were at one time used for full-scale layouts of aircraft parts, automotive parts, wiring harnesses and the like, but are slowly being phased out, due to widespread use of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM). Some visual arts fields also continue to use these paper formats for large-scale printouts, such as for displaying digitally painted character renderings at life-size as references for makeup artists and costume designers, or to provide an immersive landscape reference.

Architectural sizes[edit]

In addition to the system as listed above, there is a corresponding series of paper sizes used for architectural purposes defined in the same standard, ANSI/ASME Y14.1, which is usually abbreviated "Arch". This series also shares the property that bisecting each size produces two of the size below, with alternating aspect ratios. It may be preferred by North American architects because the aspect ratios (4:3 and 3:2) are ratios of small integers, unlike their ANSI (or ISO) counterparts. Furthermore, the aspect ratio 4:3 matches the traditional aspect ratio for computer displays.

The size Arch E1 has a different aspect ratio because it derives from adding 6 inches to each side of Arch D or subtracting the same amount from Arch E. An intermediate size between Arch C and D with a long side of 30 inches (760 mm) does not exist.

Namesin × inmm × mmRatio
Arch AArch 19 × 12229 × 3053:4
Arch BArch 212 × 18305 × 4572:3
Arch CArch 318 × 24457 × 6103:4
Arch DArch 424 × 36610 × 9142:3
Arch E1Arch 530 × 42762 × 10675:7
Arch EArch 636 × 48914 × 12193:4
Arch E2[need quotation to verify]26 × 38660 × 96513:19
Arch E3[need quotation to verify]27 × 39686 × 9919:13

Other sizes[edit]

Namein × inmm × mmRatio
Organizer J​2 34 × 570 × 127≈1.8142
Marching band flip-folder​6 34 × ​5 14171 × 133≈1.2857
Choral Octavo​6 34 × ​10 12171 × 267≈1.55
Fanfold 12 × 8.5​8 12 × 12216 × 304≈1.4118
US Std Fanfold11 × ​14 78279 × 377≈1.3513

Notebook sizes[edit]

The sizes listed above are for paper sold loose in reams. There are many sizes of tablets of paper, that is, sheets of paper bound at one edge, usually by a strip of plastic or hardened PVA adhesive. Often there is a pad of cardboard (also known as chipboard or greyboard) at the bottom of the stack. Such a tablet serves as a portable writing surface, and the sheets often have lines printed on them, usually in non-repro blue, to make writing in a line easier. An older means of binding is to have the sheets stapled to the cardboard along the top of the tablet; there is a line of perforated holes across every page just below the top edge from which any page may be torn off. Lastly, a pad of sheets each weakly stuck with adhesive to the sheet below, trademarked as "Post-It" or "Stick-Em" and available in various sizes, serve as a sort of tablet.

"Letter pads" are 8 12 by 11 inches (215.9 by 279.4 mm), while the term "legal pad" is often used by laymen to refer to pads of various sizes including those of 8 12 by 14 inches (215.9 by 355.6 mm). There are "steno pads" (used by stenographers) of 6 by 9 inches (152.4 by 228.6 mm).

In countries where the ISO sizes are standard, most notebooks and tablets are sized to ISO specifications (for example, most newsagents in Australia stock A4 and A3 tablets).

Office sizes[edit]

CompanyNamein × inmm × mmHoles
Filofax[22]M2​2 12 × 464 × 1033 holes
Mini​2 58 × ​4 1867 × 1055 holes
Pocket​3 16 × ​4 3481 × 1206 holes
Personal, Slimline​3 34 × ​6 3495 × 1716 holes
A5(513/16 × 89/32)148 × 2106 holes
Deskfax (B5)(615/16 × 927/32)176 × 2509 holes
A4(89/32 × 1111/16)210 × 2974 holes
Franklin Planner[23]Micro (⅛-Letter)​2 58 × ​4 1467 × 108
Pocket​3 12 × 689 × 152
Compact​4 14 × ​6 34108 × 171
Classic (½-Letter)​5 12 × ​8 12140 × 216
Monarch (Letter)​8 12 × 11216 × 280
JeppesenAeronautical Chart (½-Letter)​5 12 × ​8 12140 × 2167 holes
FAA3 holes at top
Namein × inmm × mmRatio
Index card3 × 576 × 1271.6
4 × 6102 × 1521.5
5 × 8127 × 2031.6
International business card​2 18 × 3.3753.98 × 85.61.586
US business card2 × ​3 1251 × 891.75
Japanese business cardca. ​2 16 × ​3 1255 × 911.654
Hungarian business cardca. 2 × ​3 1250 × 901.8

The international business card has the same size as the smallest rectangle containing a credit card. However, credit card size, as defined in ISO/IEC 7810, also specifies rounded corners and thickness.

Photography sizes[edit]

Main article: Photo print sizes

Namein × inmm × mmRatio
2R​2 12 × ​3 1264 × 891.4
-3 × 576 × 1271.6
LD, DSC​3 12 × ​4 2389 × 1191.3 (4:3)
3R, L​3 12 × 589 × 127≈1.4286
LW​3 12 × ​5 1489 × 1331.5 (3:2)
KGD4 × ​5 13102 × 1361.3 (4:3)
4R, KG4 × 6102 × 1521.5 (3:2)
2LD, DSCW5 × ​6 23127 × 1691.3 (4:3)
5R, 2L5 × 7127 × 1781.4
2LW5 × ​7 12127 × 1901.5 (3:2)
6R6 × 8152 × 2031.3 (4:3)
8R, 6P8 × 10203 × 2541.25
S8R, 6PW8 × 12203 × 3051.5 (3:2)
11R11 × 14279 × 3561.27
A3+, Super B13 × 19330 × 483≈1.46154

Postage sizes[edit]

DimensionMinimum (inch)Maximum (inch)
Height​3 12​4 14
Width56
Thickness0.0070.016

This implies that all postcards have a width:height aspect ratio in the range 1.18 to 1.71. The only ISO 216 size in the post card range is A6.

Grain[edit]

Most industry standards express the direction of the grain last when giving dimensions (that is, 17 × 11 inches is short grain paper and 11 × 17 inches is long grain paper), although alternatively the grain alignment can be explicitly indicated with an underline (11 × 17 is short grain) or the letter "M" for "machine" (11M × 17 is short grain). Grain is important because paper will crack if folded across the grain: for example, if a sheet 17 × 11 inches is to be folded to divide the sheet into two 8.5 × 11 halves, then the grain will be along the 11-inch side.[25] Paper intended to be fed into a machine that will bend the paper around rollers, such as a printing press, photocopier or typewriter, should be fed grain side first so that the axis of the rollers is along the grain.

Traditional British paper sizes[edit]

These sizes are no longer commonly used since the UK switched to ISO sizes.[26] Many of these sizes were only used for making books (see bookbinding), and would never have been offered for ordinary stationery purposes.[27]

Namein × inmm × mmRatio
Foolscap8 × 13203 × 3301.625
Quarto8 × 10203 × 2541.25
Imperial7 × 9178 × 2291.2857
Kings​6 12 × 8165 × 2031.2307
Dukes​5 12 × 7140 × 1781.27

Foolscap folio is often referred to simply as "folio" or "foolscap". Similarly, "quarto" is more correctly "copy draught quarto" and "Kings" is an alias for "Foolscap quarto".

Traditional inch-based paper sizes[edit]

Traditionally, a number of different sizes were defined for large sheets of paper, and paper sizes were defined by the sheet name and the number of times it had been folded. Thus a full sheet of "royal" paper was 25 × 20 inches, and "royal octavo" was this size folded three times, so as to make eight sheets, and was thus 10 × ​6 14 inches.

NameAbbr.FoldsLeavesPages
Foliofo, f124
Quarto4to248
Sexto, sixmo6to, 6mo3612
Octavo8vo3816
Duodecimo, twelvemo12mo41224
Sextodecimo, sixteenmo16mo41632

Imperial sizes were used in the United Kingdom and its territories.

NameClassic British definitionsModern American adaptations
in × inmm × mmRatioin × inmm × mmRatio
Emperor48 × 721219 × 18291.5
Quad demy35 × 45889 × 11431.2857
Antiquarian31 × 53787 × 13461.7097
Grand eagle​28 34 × 42730 × 10671.4609
Double elephant​26 34 × 40678 × 10161.4984
Atlas26 × 34660 × 8641.3077
Colombier​23 12 × ​34 12597 × 8761.4681
Double demy​22 12 × ​35 12572 × 9021.57​22 12 × 35572 × 8891.5
Imperial22 × 30559 × 7621.3636
Double large post21 × 33533 × 8381.5713
Elephant23 × 28584 × 7111.2174same
Princess​21 12 × 28546 × 7111.3023
Cartridge21 × 26533 × 6601.2381
Royal20 × 25508 × 6351.25same
Sheet, half post​19 12 × ​23 12495 × 5971.2051
Double post19 × ​30 12483 × 7621.6052
Super royal19 × 27483 × 6861.4203
Broadsheet18 × 24457 × 6101.3
Medium
A size chart illustrating the ISO A series and a comparison with American letter and legal formats.
Comparison of some paper and photographic paper sizes close to the A4 size.
A size chart illustrating the ISO A series.
A size chart illustrating the ISO B series.
A size chart illustrating the ISO C series.
Comparison of ISO 216 and Swedish standard SIS 014711 paper sizes between A4 and A3 sizes.
A1, A2, A3, A4 and non-ISO sizes as GOST 3450-60 formats
A2, A3, A4 and some of their derived non-ISO sizes as GOST 2301-68 formats
A size chart illustrating the ANSI sizes, superimposed on an "ANSI E" sheet.
A size chart illustrating the Architectural sizes.
Traditional and standardized paper formats still relevant in the US

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